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CONSERVATION OF BUTTERFLIES IN DELHI

Posted by Somya Sangal Apeejay Pitampura on July 26, 2011 at 8:09 AM

HELLO EVERYONE 

I AM WRITING A BLOG AFTER A VERY LONG TIME.

WHILE EXPLORING THE NET , I CAME ACROSS THE FOLLOWING REGARDING CONSERVATION OF BUTTERFLIES IN DELHI SO I DECIDED TO SHARE IT WITH U ALL.

Several  programmes like butterfly walk, breakfast with butterfly etc are run at Asola Bhatti Wild Life Sanctury, under Sajeeve,T.K., BNHS’s Education officer, at Aravali Biodiversity Park, by Dr. M.Shah Hussain under CMDE programme of Delhi University, and at Yamuna Bidiversity Park by Dr. Faiyaz. Okhla Bird Park is home to many butterflies at the bank of river Yamuna. These places are the other main hot spots of butterfly diversity in New Delhi..

THREAT TO BUTTERFLIES

Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve (NBR) has listed 41 butterflies as protected under wild life protection act 1972. The list includes 8 species under schedule I, 26 species in schedule II and 7 species in schedule IV. 300 species have already included in red data book as endangered species, which is very alarming (The Tribune).

Large-scale poaching and international nexus of smugglers is the biggest threat to Himalayan butterflies like Apollo and Swallowtail butterflies which are most threatened species. Smugglers engage locals specially children in Arunachal Pradesh, Kerala, Rohtang Pass, Assam and W.Ghats and pay them 30 –50 rupees for every butterfly they catch for them. Depending upon the species these are sold in the international market, some times for even as high as 2500—3500 dollars. China and South East Asia along with Thailand are the main hubs of international butterfly smuggling from India. Poachers come to India on student visas and they collect rare butterflies carry them in envelops , matchboxes and use many more criminal methods for their transportation and not only that they throw away all those beautiful butterflies whose wings are damaged during catch and this number may even touch to thousand some times.

Lack of expertise in the identification of butterflies poached help poachers to have an easy escape; there are many reported incidences where international smugglers were released from police custody due to lack of information on identification.

These Lepidoptera are killed, dried and used for greeting cards, and for other ornamental and decoration purposes.

This is seriously very bad as butterflies play avery important role in our ecosystem (as shared by many of my friends) . Certain steps should be taken to curb this problem.

ACTION PLANS FOR PROTECTION OF BUTTERFLIES

1- Habitat destruction of forest cover especially for species –specific host plants should be reviewed time to time.

2 - Increased vigilance on poaching of butterflies from the areas where they are found in abundance.

3- Educate school children from primary level by introducing butterfly chapters in science books about their importance in various fields related to human life.

4 – Recognise and reward those experts who are already engaged in butterfly conservation programmes and are working on their own as field guides in their area locally.

5 - Sponsored symposia and seminars in every academic institute for updating information on butterfly status in the country should be encouraged through government funding.

6 - Farmers in villages should be educated about butterfly’s importance as a pollinator in agriculture.

7 - A data bank at national level should be created where information related to butterflies and their conservation is maintained with all details including regional nomenclature of all butterflies.

8 - Academic institutions should discourage students for submitting annual projects on butterfly collection and their albums.

9 – Discourage use of over dose of pesticides in crop fields and avoid overgrazing .They kill eggs,and larvae of butterflies.

10 – Farmers should be made aware about crop rotation and monoculture plantation should be reduced. A study conducted in Assam Tea Estates shows that butterfly density was low in tea gardens because of monoculture as compared to other green forests.

I would like to ask all of you which one of the above measures is most effective and that can be incorporated in our project of butterfly in your hands.

thank you

 


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3 Comments

Reply Somya Sangal Apeejay Pitampura
1:09 PM on August 16, 2011 
Hey Ms Katy
Mind your language Miss.
I have already discussed this issue with Mrs Edith who is coordinating this project
She told me its alright to copy and paste material if we like something and ask for views .
I never said this was composed by me
i just said that these are some measures and wanted to know which one is the best.
and i think that u have not read the whole blog , cant u see that i wrote at the very beginning THAT I CAME ACROSS THIS WHILE EXPLORING THE internet
SO PLEASE BETTER CHECK BEFORE COMMENTING..
Reply Katy
12:34 PM on August 11, 2011 
Hi!
What we should expect from a thief like you? Who steels/Hotlink other people work to drive traffic to his blog. Just stop Spamming.
Reply Tribhi Kathuria
9:48 AM on July 27, 2011 
Wow, Good to see Delhi working for a noble cayse and the best part is that outcomes have been quite satisfactory